When Ken Wirth and his wife bought their house almost 20 years ago in New Guinea, Connecticut, a big perk was that it came with an aerator. 

“The dogs enjoyed chasing the bubbles,” Ken said. But about five months ago, the aerator stopped working. Fortunately, Ken’s wife kept every brochure from every vendor when they bought the house. They found an Air-O-Lator brochure and called Air-O-Lator CEO Roy Watkins. 

“Roy could not have been nicer,” Ken said. “Roy made it a personal project as if it was something he did by himself. I’m not a technical person, and Roy had incredible patience and detail and answered all my questions.” 

Ken was able to take photos of the equipment and connect Roy to the electrician so that he could fix the aerator. The electrician arrived at Ken’s house, and Roy was able to coach the electrician through the repair via a phonecall.

“Roy was very thorough,” Ken said. “I work in finance, and I deal with people and customer experiences all the time. Roy knows what it’s like to have a good experience. I felt guilty taking his time, knowing that he wasn’t going to get new business out of me because I already had an aerator. But Roy was helpful, knowledgable, and knew his stuff by heart. He did all this by memory. It was about a 3-week wait for the electrician, and during that time, Roy’s wife Peggy even started to recognize my voice when I called.” 

Ken’s experience with Roy is an excellent example of the right way to do things. “When you get someone who takes the time to explain a complicated issue in a general way, it makes you feel better about what you don’t know,” Ken said of Roy. “I knew that even if I called again, Roy would be there, ready and willing to be helpful.” 

The virtual repair to Ken’s aerator was flawless. Ken said it reassured him of the goodness of people who will get involved even though it doesn’t make business sense, but it makes “good person” sense. 

“Just because helping someone fix a problem may not lead to another sale, it doesn’t mean it’s not the right thing to do,” CEO Roy Watkins said. “In the end, you don’t have to be an original owner; if you have or inherit Air-O-Lator equipment, we’ll help you either way.”