We’ve had a frigid winter here in the Midwest. Though our de-icers are known for being durable, you still want to make sure you are taking care of your winter equipment and looking for water quality indicators.

Sustainable Solutions

De-icers are a viable solution for your water throughout the winter. By using a de-icer to thaw out your water, you’re opting not to use harmful chemicals. An Air-O-Lator Ice-Away pulls water from the bottom of your pond to the top to keep water warm and moving. This sustainable action allows you to use the water you already have to warm itself. It’s reuseable and resourceful. The Air-O-Lator De-Icer is also helpful for waterfowl and fish since it keeps their ecosystem healthy throughout even the darkest and coldest days of winter.

Check Debris

As winter storms roll in and weather changes, make sure you’re checking in on your de-icer. As branches and debris fall into bodies of water, your de-icer may collect debris as it works to move water beneath the surface. Take it out of the water every couple of weeks to make sure that it’s not blocked or damaged by any debris or clogged by leaves that fell into the water.

Frozen Machine Parts

As the water freezes, also keep an eye on your de-icer and its moving parts. It may be beneficial to take your de-icer out of your water on a relatively warm day and check your diffuser and propeller make sure that all the parts are in good working condition. Check your cables and make sure they are not damaged by severe weather. If they are, replace them.

How does a Pond De-Icer Work? 

The Ice-Away lifts 500 gallons of water per minute upward to the surface, simultaneously drawing the warmer water from below. The uniquely designed motor mount/diffuser redirects the water flow outward creating a larger area of coverage. The Ice-Away is capable of keeping an 8-foot diameter area of open water for every foot of propeller depth. The average suspended depth is approximately 5 feet up to a maximum of 8 feet.

With the optional float, the Ice-Away can be used in ponds or lakes to keep areas open for ducks, geese, and other waterfowl, as well as keeping an open area preventing winter fish kills.